Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s
Chalet Glass Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s

Chalet Glassworks Handblown Tangelo Splash Statement Centrepiece Art Glass Dish, Canadian, 1960-70s

Regular price $194.00 Save $-194.00
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This exquisite and majestic work of mid-century art glass is attributed and bears the technical hallmarks of Canadian art glassworks Chalet Artistic Glassworks which was originally located in Cornwall, Ontario. (Estd. 1962 to 1975)

Crafted with the heritage of Murano techniques, this particular piece uses the technique of Sommerso [tr. 'Submerged'] to capture the liquid Tangelo orange colour into the clear crystal base casing. The impressive 'wings' of the dish are teased outwards from the centre as the dish unfurls. Further complimenting the form are beautifully and evenly ridged lobes that trace the unfolding form.

This exceptional piece of handblown art glass is most suitable for standalone statement display and can be used either functionally or for aesthetic display.   

CONDITION
Excellent. There is negligible and most prominent wear in the form of movement marks on the underside of the base that is commensurable with the age of the piece, please refer to the photos as they form part of the condition report.

MEASUREMENTS
Height: c. 8.3" / 21 cm tall (from base to rim) x c. 19.8" / 50.3 cm in length (across longest point). Width measurements: c. 7.4" / 18.8 cm (across widest point). Base measurements: c. 4.7" / 12 cm x c. 4.7" / 12 cm. Unpackaged weight: c. kg 2.6 / 2,580 g


A LITTLE BIT OF HISTORY 
Chalet Artistic Glass (Estd. 1962 to 1975) Chalet glass was founded in 1958 in Montreal as Les Industries de Verre et Miroirs before changing its name to Murano Glass in 1960. After a devastating fire, the glassworks moved to Cornwall after encouragement from federal government financial incentives, resuming production in 1961.

The glassworks was Canada’s first handmade decorative glassware company founded by three master glass artists from Venice: brothers Angelo and Luigi Tedesco and Sergio Pagnin. Experiencing success, additional Venetian glassblowers were hired as well as local, Cornwall-based assistants. 

Early production was in the style of traditional Venetian glass that was ornate, following the joining of Sid Heyes from Toronto as its first president, and Garry Daigle as sales manager, Angelo Tedesco and the glassblowers were persuaded towards simpler styles.

Production shifted to the fluid lines and heavy free-form style of what is known as stretch glass and sales began to soar. The glassworks name was finally changed to Chalet Artistic Glass in 1962. Pieces were produced in attention captivating vivid, jewel tones in the 1960s and the organic, flowing shapes were exciting. The range was broad, including centrepieces, bowls, vases, candleholders, baskets, goblets, birds and animals. Chalet Glass entered the United States and Commonwealth markets with more than 400 shapes. 

Despite the glass artists incredible skill, there were problems within the business operations and sadly, the glassworks went bankrupt in 1975 


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